News

Massachusetts Senator Marc R. Pacheco, a UMass Amherst alumnus, will be speaking on campus on April 14 at 3:00 p.m. in Room 203 of the Morrill Science Center (III). This event is hosted by the Northeast Climate Science Center. The Senator will focus on the Commonwealth’s status as a leader on green policies and clean energy practices, as well as plans for future climate legislation. The title of his talk is “Massachusetts Action on Climate Change: A discussion of the Commonwealth’s leadership in climate action and plans for the future.” For more information click on https://necsc.umass.edu/news/massachusetts-action-climate-change.

Tony McCaffrey, a former postdoctoral researcher and current collaborator in the Center for e-Design at our Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (MIE) Department, has produced a short video to explain the new “Brainswarming” tool he has created for Innovation Accelerator, Inc., the company he founded with its CEO, James O. Pearson, an alumnus of the MIE department. Brainswarming, consisting of software that provides a better, more efficient process as an alternative to brainstorming, is the latest tool to emerge from McCaffrey’s research and will soon become an online platform for remote group work. A game version of Brainswarming is also available. Watch the video for more information on what Brainswarming is and how you can implement it: http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/03/why-you-should-stop-brainstorming/.

Assistant Professor Wei Fan of the Chemical Engineering Department has been selected to receive the prestigious 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Award from 3M Corporation. The Award recognizes “outstanding new faculty who were selected based on their research, experience, and academic leadership. The purpose of the award is to help the young faculty members achieve tenure, remain in their teaching position, and conduct research.” Fan is a young leader in the field of engineering porous materials as catalysts and carriers for biorefinery and drug delivery. His research group focuses on the rational synthesis and characterization of nanoporous materials based on the comprehensive understanding of their crystallization mechanism.

Karen Skolfield, a lecturer in the College of Engineering who teaches the required Engin 351 “Writing in Engineering” course, has won a PEN New England Award for Literary Excellence for her book of poetry, Frost in the Low Areas. The PEN New England Awards honor literary excellence in fiction, poetry, and nonfiction by New England authors. As the PEN New England website noted about Skolfield: “Frost in the Low Areas (2013) won the First Book Award for Poetry from Zone 3 Press. She is a 2014 Massachusetts Cultural Council fellow and winner of the 2014 Split This Rock poetry prize and the 2012 Oboh Prize from Boxcar Poetry Review.” See http://www.pen-ne.org/pen-new-england-awards/. Read the blurb in the Boston Globe: http://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/books/2014/03/15/noviolet-bulawayo-wins-hemingway-pen-award/JcZ64dBepOAduqeold6XRI/story.html.

The American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE) has presented alumnus Joseph A. Carnevale – a rear admiral in the U.S. Navy retired, the senior defense advisor for the Shipbuilders Council of America, and a 1971 alum of the Chemical Engineering Department – with its 2013 Frank G. Law Award, given annually since 1980 in recognition of long-term significant contributions of service to the society. A longtime supporter of the college, Carnivale has created an endowed scholarship fund here, is a frequent guest speaker, and serves on the UMass Rising Campaign Committee for the D.C. region. The ASNE citation said in part that “Over more than three decades of active involvement with the society, Rear Admiral Joe Carnevale has frequently and reliably stepped forward to assume leadership and volunteer positions to support the society and its mission in a wide variety of roles and circumstances.” 

The Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department seeks to raise a minimum of $30,000 to fund the Stephen Malkin Annual Lecture Series in honor of the late Professor Malkin (1941-2013), a visionary, a leader, and, above all, an excellent mentor, who was the MIE department head for more than six years. The purpose of the Malkin Lecture Series will be to attract a wide variety of expert speakers, who will inspire our learning community on issues of innovation and progress in engineering fields involved with manufacturing. Several of Malkin’s academic and professional colleagues have already contributed to the endowment, with more than $10,000 raised. Now you can help us grow the fund to a sustaining level of $30,000 and thus enable this wonderful lecture series. Will you join us in making a contribution to the Stephen Malkin Lecture Series Endowed Fund?

The University of Massachusetts Amherst Alumni Association has announced the recipients of its annual student scholarships and awards, and six high-achieving undergraduates from the College of Engineering were among them. The engineering recipients were: Industrial Engineering major Avery Stroman ’16, who won a $750 Alumni Merit-Based SAA Scholarship; Mechanical Engineering major Aaron Annan '15, Computer System Engineering major Michael Bjorge '15, Civil Engineering major Marissa Shea '15, and Chemical Engineering major Marianne Sleiman '15, who all received $750 William F. Field Alumni Scholarships; and Electrical Engineering major Joshua Hodge ’14, who received a $500 Senior Leadership Award.

On March 5, Professor Christopher Hollot, the head of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at UMass Amherst, delivered a talk for the Boston University Electrical and Computer Engineering Department  Distinguished Lecture Series. The series is billed as “a forum for eminent individuals from the worlds of academia and industry to share their experience and vision in various areas of electrical and computer engineering.” Designed to cover a breadth of topics, the lectures target both undergraduate and graduate students as well as faculty. Hollot’s lecture was entitled Regulation of Cell Populations in Individuals Using Feedback-Based Drug-Dosing Protocols.”

Paul Dauenhauer of the Chemical Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has been approved by the university Board of Trustees to receive the Armstrong Professional Development Professorship. The Armstrong Professorship was established in 2001 with an endowment of $850,000 by John and Elizabeth Armstrong of Amherst and a $650,000 matching grant from the University of Massachusetts President’s Distinguished Professorship Initiative. It is awarded for a three-year period “to a faculty member who is at the beginning of his/her career and has demonstrated substantial achievement and great promise in his/her area of teaching and research.”

On Saturday, April 5, the UMass Amherst chapter of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) held its inaugural, 24-hour “HackUMass, the IEEE Embedded Systems Hackathon” in the M5 maker space on the University of Massachusetts Amherst campus. A hackathon (also known as a hack day, hackfest, or codefest) is an event in which computer programmers and others involved in software development collaborate intensively on software projects, often with hardware components. “We’re holding this hackathon because we want to give students the opportunity to learn something new,” explains Andrew Sousa, an undergraduate in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and the vice chair of the UMass IEEE chapter.